Category : POLITICS

POLITICS

POLITICS

Usman Yusuf of NHIS
Usman Yusuf of NHIS

President Muhammadu Buhari has sacked the Executive Secretary of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), Professor Usman Yusuf.

This was disclosed in a statement issued by the Director, Media, Federal Ministry of Health, Mrs Boade Akinola on Monday.

According to the statement, the President has now appointed Professor Mohammed Sambo, as the new head of the NHIS.

“Following the recommendations of report by an independent fact-finding panel on the NHIS, President Muhammadu Buhari has approved the termination of appointment of the Executive Secretary, Prof. Usman Yusuf, who has been on administrative leave and has approved the appointment of Prof. Mohammed Sambo as the new executive secretary,” the statement read in part.

“Similarly, the President also approved the dissolution of the governing board of the NHIS and directed the Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Health to exercise full powers of the council pending the constitution of a new board.

“President Buhari has also approved the appointment of Dr. Chikwe Ihekweazu as Director–General of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control.

“The appointment is in line with the provisions of Section 11(1)(3) of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control(Establishment) Act, 2018.”



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Usman Yusuf of NHISPresident Muhammadu Buhari has sacked the Executive Secretary of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), Professor Usman Yusuf.This was disclosed in a
POLITICS

Rent the Runway San Francisco Ribbon Cutting with Mayor London Breed

(Photo by Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway)

Getty Images for Rent the Runway

It’s been quite a year for the high-end clothing rental service Rent the Runway. After a $125 million funding boost from Franklin Templeton Investments and Bain Capital ventures, the New-York based company reached $1 billion unicorn status.

In an interview with CNBC, co-founder and current CEO Jennifer Hyman (who started the company in 2009 with her Harvard Business School classmate Jennifer Fleiss) said the funding will give the company flexibility to “time the IPO for when Rent the Runway will have the best success.”

As a long-time Rent the Runway customer, I was thrilled to see an e-mail in my inbox today addressing some of the company’s customer service issues – an indicator that the company is keen on perfecting their model before taking the company public.

In the past, the predominantly shop-from-home service has been plagued by complaints about slow shipping times, the unavailability of timely customer service (for example, a chat service that rarely seems to be available), and quality control issues even as its customer base has grown to 8 million users.

Simply titled “We’re Sorry,” today’s e-mail addressed these issues head on, acknowledging customer frustrations and promising to “reestablish the level of customer service [customers] both expect and deserve from Rent the Runway.”

Hyman noted that transparency was key to this process. She promised a doubling of the customer service team, new tools to help customers manage their accounts without waiting a day or more for a reply, a new Twitter account for customer service at @rtrhelp, and a new 300,000 square foot fulfillment facility in Arlington, TX in order to expedite shipping and returns. Prior to its opening last week, there was only one place to ship back orders, in Secaucus, New Jersey. The e-mail also announced a series of live Twitter “RTR Town Halls” over the next month for customers to share feedback.

For customers who have been frustrated with the service in the past, it’s a welcome acknowledgement of some of the company’s flaws and a seemingly genuine desire to get it right. Hyman even acknowledged that it’s been an “exciting and sometimes bumpy journey.”

Clothing rental services – including ones like Armoire and LeTote (full disclosure: I’m a customer of all three services) – are becoming wildly popular on the heels of education campaigns about the tremendous amount of waste produced by the clothing industry. The World Economic Forum estimates that the average American disposes of 81lbs of unwanted clothing each year. The rise of fast fashion means that clothing doesn’t last as long and ends up in landfills at staggering rates. Our desire to constantly have new things combined with a flourishing $2.4 trillion industry that preys on materialism means that 100 billion items of clothing are now produced annually, 50% of which are disposed of within a year.

Add to this the growing concerns over sweatshop labor and other environmental impacts of producing clothing – it’s the second most polluting industry on earth, behind oil – and it’s easy to see why clothing rental is on the rise. If things don’t change, by 2050, experts have estimated that the fashion industry will use up 25% of the world’s carbon budget.

Even sustainable clothing companies that reduce the amount of pesticides and other waste produced still adhere to a linear economy in which each item is produced only to be purchased, worn, and disposed of. Clothing rental services aim to make fashion circular, reusing materials instead of wasting them. Giving each item of clothing a longer life is a huge energy-saver, and higher-quality clothing (along with mending services) ensures that pieces can be rented out for years.

Of course, problems remain with the circular system used by fashion rental, both financial and environmental – specifically transportation and cleaning costs. Curiously, there’s been very little research or transparency when it comes to assessing the impact of cleaning garments and transporting them all over the country for clothing rental services. While Rent the Runway has a handful of brick-and-mortar stores in large cities as well as drop boxes in some WeWork and Nordstrom locations (though these still need to be transported to the warehouse) and Armoire just opened up their first in Seattle, the vast majority of clothing is shipped via UPS. And consumer complaints about slow shipping will only put more pressure on companies to ship more, and faster.

Perhaps that’s the price we have to pay to cut down on ruinous fast fashion, but I know what I’ll be asking at those Rent the Runway town halls.

In the end, there are so many reasons to cut down on clothing waste, but the services offering to help reduce it need to work well in order to make it happen, otherwise people will head back to fast fashion to fill out their wardrobes.

It’s heartening to see the largest rental service in the country acknowledge its flaws and make strides to improve customer service so there are fewer barriers to participating in this burgeoning circular economy.

“>

Rent the Runway San Francisco Ribbon Cutting with Mayor London Breed

(Photo by Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway)

Getty Images for Rent the Runway

It’s been quite a year for the high-end clothing rental service Rent the Runway. After a $125 million funding boost from Franklin Templeton Investments and Bain Capital ventures, the New-York based company reached $1 billion unicorn status.

In an interview with CNBC, co-founder and current CEO Jennifer Hyman (who started the company in 2009 with her Harvard Business School classmate Jennifer Fleiss) said the funding will give the company flexibility to “time the IPO for when Rent the Runway will have the best success.”

As a long-time Rent the Runway customer, I was thrilled to see an e-mail in my inbox today addressing some of the company’s customer service issues – an indicator that the company is keen on perfecting their model before taking the company public.

In the past, the predominantly shop-from-home service has been plagued by complaints about slow shipping times, the unavailability of timely customer service (for example, a chat service that rarely seems to be available), and quality control issues even as its customer base has grown to 8 million users.

Simply titled “We’re Sorry,” today’s e-mail addressed these issues head on, acknowledging customer frustrations and promising to “reestablish the level of customer service [customers] both expect and deserve from Rent the Runway.”

Hyman noted that transparency was key to this process. She promised a doubling of the customer service team, new tools to help customers manage their accounts without waiting a day or more for a reply, a new Twitter account for customer service at @rtrhelp, and a new 300,000 square foot fulfillment facility in Arlington, TX in order to expedite shipping and returns. Prior to its opening last week, there was only one place to ship back orders, in Secaucus, New Jersey. The e-mail also announced a series of live Twitter “RTR Town Halls” over the next month for customers to share feedback.

For customers who have been frustrated with the service in the past, it’s a welcome acknowledgement of some of the company’s flaws and a seemingly genuine desire to get it right. Hyman even acknowledged that it’s been an “exciting and sometimes bumpy journey.”

Clothing rental services – including ones like Armoire and LeTote (full disclosure: I’m a customer of all three services) – are becoming wildly popular on the heels of education campaigns about the tremendous amount of waste produced by the clothing industry. The World Economic Forum estimates that the average American disposes of 81lbs of unwanted clothing each year. The rise of fast fashion means that clothing doesn’t last as long and ends up in landfills at staggering rates. Our desire to constantly have new things combined with a flourishing $2.4 trillion industry that preys on materialism means that 100 billion items of clothing are now produced annually, 50% of which are disposed of within a year.

WeWork x Rent the Runway Partnership Launch Event

NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 18: General atmosphere at WeWork x Rent The Runway Partnership Launch Event on October 18, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images for WeWork)

Getty Images for WeWork

Add to this the growing concerns over sweatshop labor and other environmental impacts of producing clothing – it’s the second most polluting industry on earth, behind oil – and it’s easy to see why clothing rental is on the rise. If things don’t change, by 2050, experts have estimated that the fashion industry will use up 25% of the world’s carbon budget.

Even sustainable clothing companies that reduce the amount of pesticides and other waste produced still adhere to a linear economy in which each item is produced only to be purchased, worn, and disposed of. Clothing rental services aim to make fashion circular, reusing materials instead of wasting them. Giving each item of clothing a longer life is a huge energy-saver, and higher-quality clothing (along with mending services) ensures that pieces can be rented out for years.

Of course, problems remain with the circular system used by fashion rental, both financial and environmental – specifically transportation and cleaning costs. Curiously, there’s been very little research or transparency when it comes to assessing the impact of cleaning garments and transporting them all over the country for clothing rental services. While Rent the Runway has a handful of brick-and-mortar stores in large cities as well as drop boxes in some WeWork and Nordstrom locations (though these still need to be transported to the warehouse) and Armoire just opened up their first in Seattle, the vast majority of clothing is shipped via UPS. And consumer complaints about slow shipping will only put more pressure on companies to ship more, and faster.

Perhaps that’s the price we have to pay to cut down on ruinous fast fashion, but I know what I’ll be asking at those Rent the Runway town halls.

In the end, there are so many reasons to cut down on clothing waste, but the services offering to help reduce it need to work well in order to make it happen, otherwise people will head back to fast fashion to fill out their wardrobes.

It’s heartening to see the largest rental service in the country acknowledge its flaws and make strides to improve customer service so there are fewer barriers to participating in this burgeoning circular economy.

admin2 admin2
(Photo by Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway)Getty Images for Rent the RunwayIt’s been quite a year for the high-end clothing rental service Rent
POLITICS

Our live coverage of the protests in Hong Kong has ended, but here’s what we know:

  • What happened: Protesters stormed and vandalized the legislative building in Hong Kong. These protesters broke away from the annual July 1 march that marks the anniversary of when Hong Kong was given to China. There were other demonstrations that remained remained peaceful.
  • Why they were protesting: People were protesting a bill that would allow China to extradite Hong Kong citizens. Critics worry China would use the bill to prosecute people for political reasons and that it would erode freedoms people in Hong Kong have.
  • Where the bill stands now: The city’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam, speaking at a news conference, said that she doesn’t intend to continue debating the bill, and that it will expire in July 2020 at the end of the term.
  • What happens next: Protesters have made several demands — the complete withdrawal of the extradition bill is only one of them. They are also calling for Lam to step down as well as an investigation into police brutality, a retraction of the characterization of the protests as riots and the release of arrested protesters.

Asked why police left the legislative building before protesters broke in, Police Commissioner Stephen Lo Wai-chung cited several reasons including some of the lights getting turned off.

Here’s what he said:

  • The electrical box: He said some protesters were tampering with the electrical box, turning some of the lights off in the legislative building. The commissioner said he was worried about all the lights going off and a “wrong move” would be made on either side in the darkness.
  • Increase violence: Protesters started to use violent tactics to charge the inner doors while they were outside the main entrance, the commissioner said.
  • The “local environment:” He said that because police were inside the building, they were not able to use the same methods of force they would use to control the situation in a more open space.
  • Unknown chemicals: The commissioner described protesters throwing “white smoke” at officers. He said he was worried because 13 officers were hospitalized after “toxic powder attacks” on Monday afternoon.

Thirteen police officers have been hospitalized after clashes with protesters in Hong Kong on Monday, the city’s police commissioner said.

The commissioner told reporters a chemical powder was thrown at police, adding that the action “crosses a line.” 

“Hong Kong is a safe society and none of this violence is acceptable,” he said, adding, “Police had no choice but to retreat.”

Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam strongly condemned Monday’s violent protests at the government headquarters.

“I hope the community at large will agree with us that with these violent acts that we have seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal as soon as possible,” she told reporters.

Lam went on to describe the protests as “two completely different scenes: one was a peaceful and rational parade…the other one was a heartbreaking, shocking, and law-breaking scene.”

She also said they will take necessary legal action. 

CNN’s Chandler Thornton contributed to this report.

Hong Kong’s leader Carrie Lam will hold a media briefing at police headquarters at 4 p.m. ET after a night of protests and police intervention across the city.

Several hundred, mostly young, activists were inside the Legislative Council building for hours before leaving late on Monday night.

Inside, they spray-painted slogans in Cantonese on the walls of the legislative chamber, tore down portraits and raised a black banner, that read: “There is no way left,” mounting an open challenge to China and Lam.

Claudia Mo, a pro-democracy legislator in Hong Kong, said protesters who stormed into the Legislative Council building are angry and frustrated with their government.

“They’re not inside that legislature doing all that vandalizing for fun. They were angry,” she told CNN’s Hala Gorani.

While Mo did not condone the vandalism, she said she sympathized with protesters.

“All the pictures you are seeing are shocking and they are unexpected, but then I hope the world wouldn’t just blame the young. You have to understand their temper, anger and frustration and resentment, hostility in particular against this legislature, which is just a rubber-stamping body. It’s a rubber-stamping body because it’s being dominated by Beijing minions and they outnumber the Democrats like myself included,” she said.

Mo called on the city’s embattled Chief Executive Carrie Lam to come out “sincerely and genuinely” to address residents “as soon as possible.”

A group of protesters stormed the Hong Kong government headquarters on Monday.

They smashed glass doors, pried open metal shutters to enter the building and spray-painted slogans on the walls of the Legislative Council chamber.

This is what the damage looked like:

Protesters smash glass doors and windows of the Legislative Council complex on July 01, 2019 in Hong Kong.
Protesters smash glass doors and windows of the Legislative Council complex on July 01, 2019 in Hong Kong. Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images
The portrait of Andrew Leung, the chairman of the Legislative Council, is destroyed after protesters broke into the parliament chamber of the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1, 2019.
The portrait of Andrew Leung, the chairman of the Legislative Council, is destroyed after protesters broke into the parliament chamber of the government headquarters in Hong Kong on July 1, 2019. PHILIP FONG/AFP/Getty Images
Protesters spray-paint graffiti on a sign at the Legislative Council building on July 1, 2019 in Hong Kong.
Protesters spray-paint graffiti on a sign at the Legislative Council building on July 1, 2019 in Hong Kong. Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images

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Our live coverage of the protests in Hong Kong has ended, but here's what we know:What happened: Protesters stormed and vandalized the legislative building in
POLITICS

  1. Business Insider
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A total solar eclipse will occur Tuesday and will be visible over parts of Chile, Argentina, and the south Pacific Ocean.

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Business Insider Tech A total solar eclipse will occur Tuesday and will be visible over parts of Chile, Argentina, and the south Pacific Ocean. BusinessInsider
POLITICS

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Published on Jul 1, 2019

President Trump’s 2019 Group of 20 summit in Japan consisted of hobnobbing with authoritarians, impromptu historic meetings and an apparent lack of knowledge of political terminology. The Washington Post’s Robert Costa breaks it all down. Read more: https://wapo.st/2RNNUKR. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK

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