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Trump calls UK protests fakes news, says May a tremendous professional

Trump calls UK protests fakes news, says May a tremendous professional

President Trump says the United States and the United Kingdom have an ‘extraordinary alliance’ and the top ally will get a ‘great trade deal’ after it leaves the European Union.  

‘It’s the greatest alliance the world has ever known,’ he said at a joint news conference on Tuesday afternoon with British Prime Minister Theresa May in London.

May’s final day in office is this Friday. She resigned after failing three times to convince Parliament to accept her Brexit deal.

Trump predicted that Brexit would eventually happen, saying, ‘This is a great, great country, and it wants to have its own identity.’ 

‘I think it will happen, and I believe the prime minister’s brought it to a very good point, where something will take place in the not too distant future. She’s done a very good job.’

President Trump says the United States and the United Kingdom have an ‘extraordinary alliance,’ and the top ally will get a trade deal after it leaves the European Union

‘Tremendous professional’: Trump joked that Theresa May ‘might be a better negotiator’ as he took part in their final public event. She will serve as prime minister until later in the summer while her party elects a new leader

‘It’s the greatest alliance the world has ever known,’ he said at a joint news conference on Tuesday afternoon with British Prime Minister Theresa May in London

Show of unity: Donald Trump and Theresa May spoke positively about each other and the president called the alliance with the UK the ‘greatest’ in history

Grand setting: Trump and May spoke in the Foreign Office to a backdrop of national flags

Family affair: All four of Trump’s adult children and his wife were at the press conference

WHAT PROTESTS? President Trump said reports on protests are ‘fake news’ because he didn’t see them

The couples walked out of Downing Street via a rear exit and on to the Foreign Office for their joint press conference

Trump: I refused a request from Corbyn to meet because he is a ‘negative force’

U.S. President Donald Trump turned down an invitation to meet Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (pictured today) because he is ‘somewhat of a negative force’.

Corbyn snubbed the state banquet hosted by the Queen in honor of the president on Monday and also spoke at an anti-Trump rally in Parliament Square as the U.S, leader met the prime minister at 10 Downing Street.

But the Labour leader had offered a meeting outside the official engagements of the state visit, the president revealed. 

Trump said he did ‘not know him, never met him, never spoke to him’ but turned down the meeting because he said Mr Corbyn was ‘somewhat of a negative force’.

He said: ‘He wanted to meet today or tomorrow and I decided I would not do that.

‘I think he is, from where I come from, somewhat of a negative force.

‘I think the people should look to do things correctly as opposed to criticize.

‘I really don’t like critics as much as I like and respect people who get things done – so I decided not to meet.’

A Labour spokesman confirmed Corbyn had offered to meet.

He said: ‘Jeremy Corbyn proposed a meeting with Donald Trump during the president’s visit.

‘Jeremy is ready to engage with the president on a range of issues, including the climate emergency, threats to peace and the refugee crisis.’

He told the outgoing UK leader: ‘Prime Minister May, it’s been a true honor, I have greatly enjoyed working with you, you are a tremendous professional and a person that loves your country dearly. ‘

Trump also claimed that he’s beloved in the UK, where there were protests taking place that were timed to his visit. 

Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of Britain’s largest opposition party, Labour, was participating in the Tuesday protest, after boycotting the queen’s state dinner for Trump on Monday evening.

The U.S. president’s route on Tuesday from a business roundtable to 10 Downing Street for talks with May did not take him past the protest, however, leading him to surmise at the news conference that reports on the demonstration were exaggerated.

‘I didn’t see the protesters, until a little while ago. It was a very small group of people, put in for political reasons. So it was fake news,’ he claimed.

The evening prior, the president said he didn’t see protesters on his way to Buckingham Palace.

‘So a lot of it’s fake news,’ he claimed. ‘It was tremendous spirit and love. It was great love.’ 

Corbyn and London Mayor Sadiq Khan were critical of Trump on the eve of his visit, and the U.S. president smacked them right back.  

Trump said Khan is a bad mayor. ‘He’s done a poor job. Crime is up. A lot of problems.

‘And I don’t think he should be criticizing a representative of the United States that can do so much good for the United Kingdom,’ he said. ‘We talked about it before: He should be positive, not negative. He’s a negative force, not a positive force. And if you look at what he said, he hurts the people of this great country.’

The American president revealed that Corbyn wanted to meet while he was in the UK, and he had the White House tell him no thanks. He says he ‘never spoke to him’ and doesn’t know the Labour leader.

‘I think that he is, where I come from, somewhat of a negative force,’ the president commented. ‘I really don’t like critics as much as I like and respect people who get things done. So I decided not to meet.’

Earlier on Tuesday, the president he wants to finalize a trade deal with the U.K. before May leaves office on Friday. 

May resigned last month as prime minister but delayed her departure until after the conclusion of the U.S. president’s state visit.

‘I don’t know exactly what your timing is, but stick around, let’s do this deal,’ he told May at the start of a business roundtable at St. James’s Palace.

At the presser May told a UK reporter who asked if she’d do that, ‘nice try,’ and confirmed her timeline for exiting office had not shifted. 

‘I’m a woman of my word,’ she said, reaffirming her plans to step down imminently.

Both leaders hailed the special relationship between the U.S and the UK as they prepared to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day on Wednesday in Portsmouth.

‘As with our predecessors when we have faced threats to our security of our citizens and our allies we have stood together and acted together,’ May declared at her final presser with a foreign leader before the end of her tenure.  

Even so, Trump suggested in an interview prior to the trip that he could cut of intelligence sharing with the UK, over its refusal to put restrictions on Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. The U.S. blacklisted the company and claims it is a national security threat.

He clarified Tuesday that the Five Eyes relationship remains intact, and he does not plan to change the terms.

‘We’re gonna have absolutely an agreement on Huawei and everything else. We have an incredible intelligence relationship, and we will be able to work out any differences,’ he said. ‘We did discuss it. I see absolutely no limitations. We’ve never had limitations. This is a truly great ally and partner and we’ll have no problem with that.’ 

Donald Trump Junior, Ivanka Trump and Eric Trump listen to their father, US President Donald Trump give a joint press conference at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London

The US President laughed as he said that he would have sued the EU – but added that Mrs May was ‘probably a better negotiator’

The president’s remarks came after he spoke to Boris Johnson on the telephone last night and met Jeremy Hunt several times as an official part of his visit 

The joint press conference was held at Britain’s Foreign Office on Whitehall after talks between the two leaders in No 10

President Trump said Tuesday that he wants to finalize a trade deal with the U.K. before Theresa May leaves office on Friday

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (R) escorts U.S. President Donald Trump through 10 Downing Street in London

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump review items with Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May in Downing Street, as part of Trump’s state visit in London

Protesters were rained out by the time Trump’s motorcade made its way through London on 

Despite sharing a compatible political ideology, Trump and May have not personally been as close as their politics.

But Trump said Tuesday in London that their chemistry was better than it appeared.

Trump said they’d developed an ‘outstanding’ relationship over the last two years.

‘I very much appreciate the relationship we’ve had. It’s been outstanding. And I guess some people know that, some people who don’t. But you and I know it,’ he said. ‘But it’s been, really, a very good relationship and I appreciate it very much.’

The conservative politician said he and May have a ‘good opportunity’ in her remaining time in office to ‘tremendously enlarge’ the relationship between their two countries.

He said that’s what they would discussing during the working portion of his visit in officials-only meetings at No. 10.

‘I think we’ll have a very, very substantial trade deal,’ he said. ‘And I think that this something that we both want to do, your folks want to do, and want to do, and we will get it done.’  

May also said that she and Trump had enjoyed a ‘great partnership’ that they would continue to foster bilateral meetings after the roundtable with business leaders from both countries.  

‘It is a great partnership, but I think it’s a partnership that we can take even further,’ she said. ‘That’s with of course a bilateral free trade agreement. And also I think building a wider economic partnership for the future, as well.’

May said the U.S. and U.K believe in keeping markets ‘free, fair and open’ and will seek to strike a trade agreement that honors those principles.  

‘And the numbers I think show that they speak for themselves. Trade between our nations last year was worth almost $240 billion,’ she said. ‘We see that British companies employ a million people across the US. And every morning, a million people in the UK go to work for American employers in the UK.’

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May (2L) and her husband Philip May (L) greet US President Donald Trump (2R) and US First Lady Melania Trump (R) outside 10 Downing Street

Police secure the route of US President Donald Trump and US First Lady Melania Trump to Downing Street in London on June 4, 2019, on the second day of their three-day state visit

Trump noted in his opening remarks that the U.S. and the U.K. are each other’s largest trading partners.

‘A lot of people don’t know that. I was surprised. I made that statement yesterday, and a lot of people said, ‘Gee, I didn’t know that.’ But that’s the way it is,’ he said. ‘And there’s an opportunity — I think a great opportunity — to greatly enlarge that, especially now, in light of what’s happening, to tremendously enlarge it and make it a much bigger trading relationship. ‘ 

The working visit presents an opportunity to make a deal, May had said, but of course, the timing of Trump’s trip has its challenges, she acknowledged.

‘I think there are huge opportunities for us to seize together, and challenges for us to work together on to tackle as well,’ she said. ‘And the opportunity today is that we are going to look at how we do both of those.’ 

The Queen had already invited Trump for the state visit that’s taking place more than two years into his term when May said she’d leave her post to make way for a successor to pass a Brexit agreement in Parliament that she never could. 

Trump has suggested he prefers conservative politician Boris Johnson as her replacement, but he has not endorsed him for the position.

He was said to have called Johnson on Tuesday while he was in London. The White House has not responded to a request for comment.   

The U.S. president claims multiple British politicians have sought his backing in the race for prime minister, and he met Tuesday afternoon in London with Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage in Winfield House, the ambassador’s house and Trump’s in-town residence.

Farage and Trump are longtime friends – the British politician stumped for him in 2016 – and the president congratulated him on his election victory last month.

Ranting opposition leader Corbyn accuses Trump of ‘creating a sense of hate’ – as tens of thousands of protesters FAIL to show up for demonstration

Jeremy Corbyn this afternoon delivered a firebrand speech to anti-Donald Trump protesters in London – obliquely accusing the President of ‘creating a sense of hate’ and fostering racism.

In an extraordinary speech for a politician who could one day have to work with Mr Trump, the Labour leader did not mention the President by name but played on familiar themes of his critics in a high-energy speech. 

Mr Corbyn also sprung to the defence of London Mayor Sadiq Khan one day after he was called a ‘stone cold loser’ by Mr Trump – and suggested the President had ‘created a greater sense of hate and hatred’.

The 70-year-old politician who hopes to one day become Britain’s prime minister spoke as tens of thousands of protesters failed to turn up to anti-Trump demonstrations today which had been billed as a ‘carnival of resistance’.

Photographs showed a lacklustre crowd of only a few tens of thousands of activists at most gathering while the President was inside 10 Downing Street meeting Prime Minister Theresa May as part of his three-day state visit. 

March organisers have already downgraded their expectations from 250,000 people to just 75,000 – blaming a ‘working Tuesday’ for the lower number, which is the most organisers believe they can expect to turn up.  

Mr Corbyn raged at the US President in a frothing speech at Parliament Square – condemning him for treating refugees like ‘enemies’, ignoring climate change, and trying to exploit the NHS for profit. In a message that will delight his hard-Left acolytes, he insisted Mr Trump had ‘no answers’ on how to create ‘peace and justice’.

Despite snubbing the ceremonial banquet the Queen threw for Mr Trump last night, Mr Corbyn – known for sitting down with Hamas, Hezbollah and the IRA in the past – denied he was avoiding talking to Mr Trump.

Mr Trump himself said in a joint press conference with Mrs May this afternoon that the Labour leader had asked for a meeting, but he had refused, describing Mr Corbyn as a ‘somewhat negative force’. 

The President added: ‘I think the people should look to do things correctly as opposed to criticise – I really don’t like critics as much as I like and respect people who get things done – so I decided not to meet.’ 

He also dismissed the protests as ‘fake news’, saying: ‘We left the Prime Minister, the Queen, the royal family, there were thousands of people on the streets cheering. Even coming over today there were thousands cheering.

‘Then I heard there were protests, I said ‘Where are the protests? I don’t see any protests’. I did see a small protest today when I came – very small – so a lot of it is fake news I hate to say.’

Jeremy Corbyn this afternoon delivered a firebrand speech to anti-Donald Trump protesters at Trafalgar Square in London

Thousands of anti-Trump protesters gather at Trafalagar Square today, but estimates of 250,000 people seemed off the mark

Police officers try to restore order after a scuffle breaks out between those for and against Donald Trump in London today

US President Donald Trump’s limousine The Beast (circled in red) passes in sight of the Baby blimp at Parliament Square today

Poor turnout: Extremely thin crowds gathered around the Trump Baby blimp at Parliament Square this afternoon

Thousands of protesters make their presence known at Trafalgar Square in London today as they protest Mr Trump’s visit

Placards are placed on the ground at Trafalgar Square that went uncollected ahead of the march in London today

Uncollected placards are placed around Trafalgar Square today, including some saying: ‘No to Trump, no to war’

MailOnline reader Lisa Sergent sent in a photo of abandoned placards on the ground, saying: ‘You call these eco-warriors?’

And he said ‘protest and activism’ was the best way to bring about political change. The furious language will heighten fears that a Corbyn premiership could lay waste to the Special Relationship.

The veteran Left-winger has spent decades complaining about US power, demanding the West gives up nuclear weapons unilaterally. Mr Trump has already warned that he would have to see whether Mr Corbyn could be trusted before agreeing to continue crucial security cooperation.Mr Trump himself said in a joint press conference with Mrs May this afternoon that the Labour leader had asked for a meeting, but he had refused, describing Mr Corbyn as a ‘somewhat negative force’. 

The President added: ‘I think the people should look to do things correctly as opposed to criticise – I really don’t like critics as much as I like and respect people who get things done – so I decided not to meet.’ 

He also dismissed the protests as ‘fake news’, saying: ‘We left the Prime Minister, the Queen, the royal family, there were thousands of people on the streets cheering. Even coming over today there were thousands cheering.

‘Then I heard there were protests, I said ‘Where are the protests? I don’t see any protests’. I did see a small protest today when I came – very small – so a lot of it is fake news I hate to say.’

Jeremy Corbyn this afternoon delivered a firebrand speech to anti-Donald Trump protesters at Trafalgar Square in London

Thousands of anti-Trump protesters gather at Trafalagar Square today, but estimates of 250,000 people seemed off the mark

Police officers try to restore order after a scuffle breaks out between those for and against Donald Trump in London today

US President Donald Trump’s limousine The Beast (circled in red) passes in sight of the Baby blimp at Parliament Square today

Mr Corbyn is escorted away from Parliament Square after delivering a speech during the demonstration in London today

Poor turnout: Extremely thin crowds gathered around the Trump Baby blimp at Parliament Square this afternoon

Socialist demonstrators wave flares as they take part in a protest against US President Donald Trump in London this afternoon

Thousands of protesters make their presence known at Trafalgar Square in London today as they protest Mr Trump’s visit

Placards are placed on the ground at Trafalgar Square that went uncollected ahead of the march in London today

Protesters march to Whitehall from Trafalgar Square this afternoon as they protest the state visit by President Trump

Uncollected placards are placed around Trafalgar Square today, including some saying: ‘No to Trump, no to war’

Protesters gather at Trafalgar Square today. Organisers say the rally could be ‘the biggest demonstration in British history’

MailOnline reader Lisa Sergent sent in a photo of abandoned placards on the ground, saying: ‘You call these eco-warriors?’

Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell joins the march against the visit of President Trump in London this afternoon

And he said ‘protest and activism’ was the best way to bring about political change. The furious language will heighten fears that a Corbyn premiership could lay waste to the Special Relationship.

The veteran Left-winger has spent decades complaining about US power, demanding the West gives up nuclear weapons unilaterally. Mr Trump has already warned that he would have to see whether Mr Corbyn could be trusted before agreeing to continue crucial security cooperation.

Trump’s hot-button issues as he spends three days in Britain 

  • Brexit

Donald Trump called on Britain to leave the European Union without a deal if Brussels refuses to meet its demands, as he urged the government to send Nigel Farage into the negotiations. 

In an interview before he flew to Britain, the U.S. president said the UK should quit the EU without an agreement, if Brussels refused to meet its demands.

He said Britain had to ‘get the deal closed’ and leave, and even suggested quitting without paying the £39billion divorce bill.

‘If they don’t get what they want, I would walk away,’ he told the Sunday Times. ‘If I were them I wouldn’t pay $50billion.’

  • Boris Johnson 

Donald Trump threw a hand grenade into the Tory leadership race by heaping praise on Boris Johnson.

The U.S. president said he liked the former Foreign Secretary and thought he would do ‘a very good job’ as prime minister.

Although, the comments fell short of an official endorsement, it sparked a huge debate on the eve of Mr Trump’s state visit to the UK.

Asked about Johnson and the Tory leadership race, the president said: ‘It’s something that I find very interesting.

‘I actually have studied it very hard. I know the different players. But I think Boris would do a very good job. I think he would be excellent,’ he said.

He added: ‘I like him. I have always liked him. I don’t know that he is going to be chosen, but I think he is a very good guy, a very talented person. He has been very positive about me and our country.’

  • Huawei   

Trump warned Theresa May not to let Chinese mobile giant Huawei have any role in Britain’s 5G network in an interview published hours before arriving in the UK. 

Trump said: ‘We work very closely with your country and so you have to be very careful.’

The president will ban Huawei from America’s next mobile network and is urging allies to do the same.

  • Sadiq Khan

Donald Trump mocked London Mayor Sadiq Khan for being a ‘stone cold loser’ as the U.S. President arrived in Britain for his three-day state visit.

In return, the mayor’s office immediately fired back, saying Trump was offering ‘childish insults which should be beneath the President of the United States.’

Khan further suggested Trump is a threat to democracies around the world. 

Trump said Khan had done a ‘terrible job,’ hitting back after the mayor compared the language used by him to that of ‘fascists of the 20th century.’ 

The U.S. president and Khan have repeatedly clashed in recent years, from Trump’s criticism of the mayor’s response to the 2017 London Bridge terror attack to Khan’s assault of the American president’s travel ban affecting mostly-Muslim countries.

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